25 April, 2011

Karen Kenworthy: RIP

Just received this forward from a friend:
Dear Friends,

I suspect that many of you have noticed that the last issue of Karen©s Power Tools Newsletter was dated March 17, 2010, and you may have been anxiously awaiting another. It is with great sadness that I write to tell you of Karen©s death on April 12, 2011, after a long struggle with several debilitations, including diabetes.

I know that Karen touched many of you with her kindness, wit, creativity and encouragement. She was a loving daughter, sister, aunt and friend. And she was a pretty darned good programmer, too. We are deeply grieving her loss.

For now, Karen©s server is still running, the programs she has written can still be downloaded, and donations can still be made through the website. We are also working to fill all CD orders that have been submitted or mailed. It is difficult to make business decisions while grieving. So, at this point, I cannot say what will be the future of KarenWare.com, except to say that we will certainly continue Karen©s commitment to safeguard your privacy as shown at the Privacy link of KarenWare.com.

Many of you have already written many kinds words of condolence and comfort. Please know that we greatly appreciate you. If you care to make a contribution in her honor, she was a long-time supporter of The Dohnavur Fellowship, a special children©s ministry in southern India. You can learn more about them at www.DohnavurFellowship.org.

All we ask is that you remember her whenever you take the case off of your computer, contemplate removing entries from your Windows Registry, listen to Bob Wills or Riders in the Sky, or wave and say ©Hi!© to anyone on the ©net.

May God richly bless you, as He has all those who knew Karen.

Bill Kenworthy
Karen©s brother
That woman made some some great software and I first came across her work from the old Windows Magazine and then WinMag.com which was bought out by Information Week and not as good as the original.

Thank you Karen Kenworthy and may such a fine Texas woman Rest In Peace.


19 April, 2011

April 19th

Last call to wake up.

  • In 1861 - Riots occurred in Baltimore, Maryland and the illegal union blockade of the Confederate states starts.
  • In 1933 - The traitor FDR announced he was further working towards destroying the economy by announcing the US will leave the Gold Standard.
  • In 1939 - After 148 years, Connecticut approves the Bill of Rights.
  • In 1943 - Though, not US history, the Warsaw Ghetto uprising happens and the starving Jews kick some Nazi ass.
  • In 1989 - USS Iowa's gun turret explodes killing 47 crewmen.
  • In 1995 - The Alfred P. Murray Feral Building, in Oklahoma City is nearly destroyed. (It took EXTRA feral demolition teams to finish the job as they got it wrong the first time.)
  • In 1993 - The might of the united States government sweeps in with the winds and ends their 51-day siege upon a Church, founded and run by it's citizens in Waco, Texas. Seventy-four (74) men, women and children died from gas, gunshot, and fire by feral agents acting in the name of "We the People." These feral agents received NO punishment for the crimes, as "We the People", though filled with righteous indignation, did nothing, even unto this day.
  • In 1775 - Feral agents of the government came to take our arms away and the "Shot heard round the World" was answered by many great men. One in particular needs mentioning, as I am sure if he had been alive in 1993, he would have done the same thing.
His name was Sam Whittemore and:
"There, before the eyes of his astonished family, Sam methodically loaded his musket and both of his famed dueling pistols, put his powder and ball inside his worn and well-traveled military knapsack, strapped his French saber around his waist, squared his grizzled jaw and, as he strode briskly out the door, simply informed his worried family that he was "going to fight the British regulars" and told them to remain safely indoors until he returned.

Whittemore walked to a secluded position behind a stone wall on Mystic Street, near the corner of what is now Chestnut Street in Arlington, and calmly settled in. Some of the Minutemen pleaded with Whittemore to join them in their safer positions, but he ignored their admonitions. Soon the 47th Regiment of Foot, followed by the main body of British troops, appeared in view. On both sides of Whittemore, Minutemen were shooting at the approaching Redcoats and then sprinting away to where they could reload in safety.

Waiting until the regiment was almost upon him, Whittemore stood up, aimed his musket carefully and fired, killing a British soldier. He then fired both dueling pistols, hitting both of his targets, killing one man outright and mortally wounding another. Not having time to reload his cumbersome weapons, he grabbed his French saber and flailed away at the cursing, enraged Redcoats who now surrounded him. Some of those infuriated soldiers were probably less than one quarter of Sam's 80 years; few, if any, were even half his age.

One Englishman fired his Brown Bess almost point-blank into Whittemore's face, the heavy bullet tearing half his cheek away and knocking him flat on his back. Undaunted, Whittemore attempted to rise and continue the fight, but received no less than 13 bayonet wounds from the vengeful Redcoats. They also mercilessly clubbed his bleeding head and drove their musket butts into his body as they ran by.

When the last Britisher had left the scene and was far enough away for them to come out in safety, the villagers who had seen Whittemore's last stand walked slowly toward the body. To their astonishment, he was still alive and conscious--and still full of fight! Ignoring his wounds, he was feebly trying to load his musket for a parting shot at the retreating regiment.

A door was used as a makeshift stretcher and Whittemore was carried to the nearby Cooper Tavern. Doctor Nathaniel Tufts of Medford stripped away Sam's torn, bloody clothing and was aghast at his many gaping bayonet wounds, the other numerous bruises and lacerations, and his horrible facial injury. According to every medical text Tufts had ever studied and all of his years of experience treating injured people, the old man should have bled to death from internal injuries."
That old glorious bastard did not die though, he lived another eighteen (18) years and when asked if he ever regretted his actions, Sam replied:
"No! I would take the same chance again!"